Bill and Lisa's 1929 Manville Heights home

News

Meet Your Neighbor

Meet Bill & Lisa

by Adam Pretorius | March 10th, 2013

VIEW ALL PHOTOS

Into the Woods

Counterpoint to City Life

When Bill and Lisa Case set out to construct their new home, they wanted to evoke the character of their 1929 European cottage in Manville Heights. Along with vintage aesthetics a focus on efficiency appealed to the owners. “We live the same way as we lived in the other home,” explains Lisa.  So it was natural that many of the features of their existing home would be transplanted to their newly built home in the Peninsula Neighborhood. The owners selected and built on the first lot in the Peninsula Estates area after walking through the grounds and wooded areas to find the perfect spot. The qualities that made it desirable–a steep, heavily treed slope overlooking water–were as important as the amount of light for plantings and panoramic views.

 

For Lisa, a garden area was a requirement, but the natural surroundings made gardening a challenge. “We never lived this close to older woods where people hadn’t lived before,” Lisa explains about the wildlife. “There’s a lot of underbrush, unlike our previous wooded ravine surrounded by houses.”  With the woods came wildlife. The land is a mix of sand and clay, so fertile railroad-tie-surrounded flower and garden beds were created with tall, attractive fencing to keep deer, groundhogs, raccoons, and rabbits away from flourishing tomatoes, kale, herbs, and other plants. The homeowners purchased an adjacent southern lot where they plan to add a rock garden wall, fig and peach trees, and natural landscaping.

 

Overlooking their garden and adjacent lot is the owners’ favorite structural feature, a large and welcoming cedar, screened porch that juts off a corner of the home. “We also wanted ‘big living’ inside the home so we could enjoy the view,” Lisa explains about the open floor plan. Just inside the front door, a two-story foyer leads to a Great Room with soaring 18-foot ceilings, ample daylight, and rustic surfaces that blend in with natural surroundings. A wooden beam centers the cathedral ceiling in this room, which has an array of metal- and oak-trimmed windows overlooking the river valley. A gas stove with a chimney was installed in place of a fireplace for heat efficiency, to save space, and to avoid blocking the view. An abundance of trees close to the home make the interior a treehouse-like sanctuary. Birdhouses were added at window height to attract wildlife close to the living spaces.

 

Two trails run along the slope below, and a third trail for hikers and bikers recently was added closer to the river. “It’s fantastic to have a place to walk,” says Lisa. She adds that there are wonderful night views.  “When it’s dark, the city lights across the river make it feel like you’re somewhere else.”

Comments | Contact

Have a story or feedback about an article?

The Event Committee would love to hear from you.

Submitting Form...

The server encountered an error.

Received Message, THANKS

CAPTCHA placeholder image
  • Meet Neighbors

    Meet Your Neighbor

    Meet Kate

    Meet Your Neighbor

    Meet Bill & Lisa

    Meet Your Neighbor

    Meet Jake

    Meet Your Neighbor

    Meet Melissa & Alan

    Meet Your Neighbor

    Meet Amy & Adam

    Meet Your Neighbor

    Meet Karen

    Meet Your Neighbor

    Meet Greg

    Meet Your Neighbor

    Meet Diana and Carmen

  • Meet Pet Neighbors

    Meet Pet Neighbors

    Meet Sully

    Meet Pet Neighbors

    Meet Frogbert

    Meet Pet Neighbors

    Meet Linus

  • Meet Wild Neighbors

    Wild Neighbors

    Frogs

    Wild Neighbors

    Bountiful Bunnies

    Wild Neighbors

    Hummingbirds

Meet Your Neighbor

Meet Greg

CLICK HERE

Community is the heart of New Urbanism. Have a story to share on this website?

FOOTER NAVIGATION

SUBSCRIBE TODAY

Copyright 2003 | Adam Pretorius

Submitting Form...

The server encountered an error.

Form received.

CAPTCHA placeholder image